Airbnb Expands In Africa

With almost 20000 homes being shared in South Africa alone and the number of people staying in an Airbnb when travelling into Africa is more than tripling every year. It seems like the sharing economy is gaining momentum in Africa and the sharing economy is not just about economy, it’s about travel and the new way to experience a destination.

AirBNB

#1     Sharing economy – What’s mine is yours 

Studies show that the global sharing economy is already worth more than 220 billion South African Rand a year and could easily grow to 20 times that (335 billion USD) by 2026

#2     Unique accommodations – Love this? Live there!

Unusual and unique accommodations are definitely on the rise. Airbnb’s most booked listing is a treehouse with 600 more to choose from . Many of those are located in Africa along with more than 1.400 villas and 270 private islands so every African traveller can make his or her childhood dreams come true. 

#3 Staycations, Bleisure and Fake-cations

South Africa is one of the few countries where more than 50% of all trips booked on Airbnb are domestic.  A quick getaway within South Africa  – local Airbnb hosts that provide personal hospitality and tips make a staycation fun and help to see familiar neighbourhoods with  fresh eyes! Also, combining business and pleasure into the now famed buzzword “bleisure” is a trend with a unique listing.

Airbnb empowers regular South Africans to use their homes as economic assets

  • In South Africa in 2015, there were 7,500 active hosts sharing their home. In the last year, the typical host earned an extra 28,000 ZAR by sharing his home
  • The average host is 44 years old and 36 percent are over 50

Airbnb increases consumer choice and helps grow and diversify travel across South Africa

  • 134,000 guests used Airbnb to visit South Africa in the past year
  • 99,000 South African residents used Airbnb for their travels

Want to try Airbnb?

 

Screen Shot 2016-06-14 at 15.50.13

Now Airbnb Expands in Africa how does it fit in the Southern Africa travel industry?

Nicola D’Elia, Airbnb General Manager for Africa and the Middle East highlights how Airbnb helps to spread benefits to new communities and local businesses: “Airbnb is good news for everyone, providing an economic boost for thousands of South Africans, helping them make ends meet and support their families by hosting on Airbnb. 27% of visitors to Cape Town for example – Airbnb’s largest market in South Africa – tell us that they wouldn’t have come at all or stayed as long if it hadn’t been for Airbnb. Half of those guests spend more money in local shops and restaurants, often following their hosts’ recommendations. Even if it’s just for a night, staying with local hosts will allow visitors to really live there.”

“Airbnb is good news for everyone, providing an economic boost for thousands of South Africans, helping them make ends meet and support their families by hosting on Airbnb. 27% of visitors to Cape Town for example (Airbnb’s largest market in South Africa) tell us that they wouldn’t have come at all or stayed as long if it hadn’t been for Airbnb. Half of those guests spend more money in local shops and restaurants, often following their hosts’ recommendations. Even if it’s just for a night, staying with local hosts will allow visitors to really live in Cape Town.”

Tim Harris, CEO at Wesgro, the tourism, trade and investment promotion agency for Cape Town and the Western Cape, agrees: “Cape Town and the Western Cape is a world class tourism destination. Thanks to Airbnb, more travellers can enjoy the natural beauty our country has to offer in an authentic way. It’s great to see that outside Cape Town, Knysna is the second most popular town with the Airbnb community. This shows how Airbnb hosts are helping to drive visitors across the province, allowing them to experience more of the Western Cape with their local hosts. “

The Economic Impact studies of Airbnb in  cities around the world.